Learn finance social media content from the best

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Follow the leaders
By Susan Burchill, staffer. 19 December, 2019
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Being a true thought leader in finance social media content is oft attempted but rarely realised. We take a look at LinkedIn’s global list of top-rated members in 'Finance and the Economy' for 2019 and distill some important lessons.

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LinkedIn's annual ‘Top Voices 2019: Finance and Economy’ lists 10 investors, strategists, executives and entrepreneurs they believe to be the network’s best community builders and conversation starters. You can read the full list for yourself here. How did LinkedIn choose these “must-follow” high achievers? They analysed quantitative data over 12 months, e.g., volume of responses, how the responses spread and the actions they generated. They then they applied a qualitative filter by examining each member’s body of work: is it insightful, conversational and timely, does it reflect the world we work in today, does it avoid self-promotion? At The Dubs, we went a step further. We’ve identified 5 winning storytelling devices that should inspire your finance social media content.

We’ve identified 5 winning storytelling devices that should inspire your finance social media content.

1. Introducing human stories to highlight their talking points

Kristina Hooper, Chief Global Market Strategist at Invesco talks of growing up in New York City to lead into a story about vigilante protectionism. Thasunda Brown Duckett, CEO Chase Consumer Banking describes the “love, strength and sacrifice” of her parents that contributed to her purpose-driven approach. Over on her page, Sonia Wedrychowicz describes the early days of her career with affection, posting a photo of herself with former colleagues. Each of these thought leaders is drawing readers in with analogies that illustrate their concepts and connect with their readers. Edward Yardeni is another one. He’s president and chief investment strategist at Yardeni Research. He also does movie reviews in his LinkedIn posts. Roger Ebert he isn’t, but it’s an endearing, accessible way to connect with readers.

2. Writing like writers

The LinkedIn Top Voices don’t drown their stories in jargon. They break up their paragraphs with short questions and statements to create a rhythm that keeps audiences engaged. They divide long articles with subheads so a reader can scan the content. These are all classic writing techniques. Having a distinctive voice is important too. CEO of ZestMoney, Lizzie Chapman has a zesty, youthful style of language; her business is about inclusion and her language is plain-speaking and warm enough to include everyone. “Just touched down in Bangalore after a week in Europe immersed in fintech - investors, companies and ecosystem - and have never been more excited and grateful to be building in India (at ZestMoney). It's now extremely clear; we operate in the most exciting, advanced and sophisticated fintech market in the world. And it's basically day 1.” Lizzie Chapman Learn finance social media content from the best

3. Showing a passion for their work and their subject matter

Like Lizzie Chapman, Thasunda Brown Duckett promotes financial wellness for women and financial inclusion (amongst other things) and that comes through loud and clear in her LinkedIn posts: “Power of working for a company with so many BOSS women! Love that the sisterhood across all levels of our organization.” Learn finance social media content from the best Similarly, in posts by Matarin Capital Management co-founder Nili Gilbert, the strength of her convictions shines through. CEO of Discovery Limited, Adrian Gore takes a stand and writes passionately about violence against women and children, and his love for his homeland, South Africa. In all of these social feeds, the writing is simple and avoids CEO-esque, opaque language.

4. Not shy about taking a controversial stance

In one post, self-confessed contrarian Ritesh Jain likens companies that are funded by private equity to drug peddlers. That confidence to make such strong, colourful statements certainly delights followers and promotes shares.

5. Not sweating production values on videos, but engaging like a pro

Do you need bells and whistles and a full camera crew to attract and maintain an audience? No - you just need to be a subject matter expert and a storyteller. Being creative in the ways you connect with your audience helps too. After his conference was cancelled in Venice (worst flooding the city had seen since 1966) Aperture Investors UK CIO Simon Thorp created a selfie video of himself against a view of the floodwaters and netted 3,487 views. All of his videos are lo-fi, but they’re no less appealing for it. It takes a certain kind of confidence to bring up stories of your childhood or to share what fires you up as a person – and to use a language style that’s not loaded down with high-falutin’ industry speak. It also takes emotional intelligence to not use the opportunity to make a sales pitch, and to realise that the people you’re talking to, regardless of their seniority or level of expertise, are humans interested in human stories. Congratulations #LinkedInTopVoices 2019, for scoring well on all fronts. To join the ranks of finance brands with a strong voice on social, get in touch to find out how we can help.

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When Susan was a youngster she didn't know what she wanted to be, but somehow she fell into advertising; then digital was invented so she worked on websites for a while. From there it was a small leap over to TV producing, scriptwriting, promo writing, and some copywriting.... Then when content marketing became a 'thing', she somehow fell into that. It's worked out ok so far - luckily she's always landed on soft things.